Development of Russian Piano School and Techniques Used in Russian Piano Education

Authors

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.47750/pegegog.14.03.02

Keywords:

Russian piano school, Russian piano education, Russian piano technique

Abstract

Throughout the history of classical music piano, various schools have emerged, often named after cities such as London, Vienna, and Hamburg. Today, it is widely accepted that there are three major piano schools: the French, German, and Russian schools. This study briefly mentions the history of Russian classical music and the development of the piano school in the country. It explores the individuals who played a significant role in this process and the techniques they employed in piano education. The main objective of the study is to determine the development of the piano school in Russia, the key influencers in this process, and the techniques used in piano education.  The study employed a literature review and semi-structured interviews. As a result of the study it can be said that many important artists and teachers, especially Anton and Nicolai Rubinstein, created a classical music culture and tradition in Russia. Piano education based on a solid foundation, combined with the musical talent of the Russian nation, has enabled Russia to become one of the leading countries in piano performance today.

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References

Books

Alekseev, A. (1948). Russkie pianisty [Russian pianists], Moscow: Muzyka.

Barnes, C. (2008), (editör & tercüman.), The Russian Piano School: Russian Pianists & Moscow Conservatoire Professors on the Art of the Piano London: Kahn & Averill Publishers,

Bree, M. The Groundwork of Leschetizky Method. trans. Dr. Theodore Baker. New York: Schirmer, 1902.

Brown, D. (1978). Tchaikovsky: The Early Years 1840-1874. New York: W.W. Norton & Company.

Maes, F. (1996) A History of Russian Music: From Kamarinskaya to Babi Yar California: University of California Press

Poznansky, A. (1991). Tchaikovsky: The Quest for the Inner Man. New York: Schirmers

Press

Rubinstein, A. (1983). Literaturnoe nasledie [Literary heritage]. 3 Vols. Moscow: Muzyka.

Sachs, H. (1982). Virtuoso. New York: Thames and Hudson Press.

Samson, J. (1996). Master Musicians “Chopin”, New York: Oxford University Press.

Schick, R D. (1982). The Vengerova System of Piano Playing. Pennsylvania: The Pennsylvania State University Press.

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Taylor, P.S. (2007). Anton Rubinstein: A Life in Music, Illinois: Illinois University Press.

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Music Magazines and Academic Journals

Drouker, S. (1908). Notes on Rubinstein's Teaching. Etude 26. V. 26, Number 11 (November 1908).

Jordan, K. (1992). “The Legacy of Anton Rubinstein.” Clavier 31: December 1992).

Zenkin, K. (2001). The Liszt Tradition at the Moscow Conservatoire. Studia Musicologica Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae (T. 42, Fasc. 1/2), 93-108.

Dissertations

Chang, A.L.L. (1994). The Russian School of advanced piano technique: Its history and development from the 19th to 20th century. (Unpublished doctorate dissertation), The University of Texas, Austin.

Kofman, I. (2001). The History of The Russian Piano School: Individuals and Traditions. (Unpublished doctorate dissertation) University of Miami, Florida.

Wan, B.C.P. (2016). Contemporary Russian Piano School Pedagogy and Performance. (Unpublished doctorate dissertation). King’s Collage, London.

Interviews

Basmacıoğlu, K. (2023). Characteristics of French, German and Russian piano schools. Online İnterview.

Faryniarz, Z. (2023). Characteristics of French, German and Russian piano schools. Phone İinterview.

Keduk, K. (2023). Characteristics of French, German and Russian piano schools. Online İnterview.

Szymczak, G. (2023). Characteristics of French, German and Russian piano schools. Online İnterview.

Ünaldı, Ö. (2023). Characteristics of French, German and Russian piano schools. Online İnterview.

Internet Sources

https://www.britannica.com (Access Date 21.04.2022)

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Published

2024-04-05

How to Cite

Kızılay, M. O., & Sökezoğlu Atılgan, D. (2024). Development of Russian Piano School and Techniques Used in Russian Piano Education. Pegem Journal of Education and Instruction, 14(3), 15–20. https://doi.org/10.47750/pegegog.14.03.02